Certification Sentinel

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March 2020

From-the-director

Happy Certification Day

The Certification Program has launched two big initiatives in 2020. We have begun the implementation plan for a new software program dedicated solely to certification called Certelligence®, which was developed by the ACGI Software group. This system will be user-friendly and offers quick, efficient service for application, renewal, and general record-keeping for certificants.

Also included is a portfolio system for renewal. Certificants will be able to enter and log renewal activities throughout the five-year cycle. When renewal time arrives, it could be completed already in the system. An application to renew that’s submitted would trigger a review of what is loaded. If desired, the certificant could also automatically load documentation when the activity is posted, thus saving submission of documents if an application to renew is selected for audit.

The program is also changing testing platform vendors. The new vendor will be Scrantron®. Customer service will be enhanced for all applicants. Scrantron® is also worldwide and this change will facilitate customer service for international testers. Speaking of international, the Certification Program will be exhibiting at the NETNEP International Nurse Education Conference, sponsored by Elsevier, in Sitges, Spain. A poster presentation for the general poster sessions was also accepted.

Testing Outcomes

The below results are from the start of the testing cycle with new forms for CNE.

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Best regards,

Dr. Larry Simmons

CNE-SENTINEL---3The Maryland Higher Education Commission (MHEC) administers the Nurse Support Program II (NSP II) on behalf of the Maryland Health Services Cost Review Commission (HSCRC). NSP II staff hosted the 6th Certified Nurse Educator (CNE) Workshop for nominated nurse faculty led by Dr. Diane Billings on February 21 in Columbia, Maryland.  

Our speaker, Dr. Billings, is a well-recognized leader in nursing education. She is the co-editor of the award winning Teaching in Nursing, and has published widely in peer-reviewed nursing journals and academic textbooks. She is the recipient of the Sigma Theta Tau International Founders Award for Excellence in Teaching, the Award for Outstanding Leadership in Nursing Education from the NLN, and is a Living Legend in the American Academy of Nursing. 

In attendance were 29 full-time nurse faculty representing 13 nursing programs at seven community colleges and six universities across the state. Since January 2018, the NSP II has coordinated CNE workshops at the request of the Maryland Council of Deans and Directors of Nursing Programs (MCDDNP) through a formal partnership and strong working relationship with Dr. Janice Brewington at the NLN. Each workshop is an intensive, comprehensive review of the major content areas of the test blueprint. It is designed to help potential candidates assess their level of readiness and identify practice domains where further study may be needed. 

Faculty achieving certification are eligible for the NSP II Academic Nurse Educator Certification (ANEC) award. In faculty surveys, two key factors were the perceived value of certification and funding to support the individual's investment to achieve the credential, and the continuing education requirements to maintain the initial certification. In 2019, NSP II staff worked with 28 nursing deans and directors to develop the ANEC guidelines. In June 2019, 57 full-time nurse faculty received the ANEC award, which provides $5,000 to each faculty member who achieves or renews the NLN's CNE each year. 

During the month of March 2020, ANEC nominations are in process as recognition of certification and demonstration of continued excellence in the specialty practice of nursing education. The NSP II goal is to double the number of nurse faculty with the CNE credential through this annual faculty award, recognizing the value of excellence in education and the impact on preparing the future nursing workforce in Maryland.

Peg E. Daw, DNP, RN-BC, CNE
Nurse Support Program II Administrator

CNE-SENTINEL--1Much can be learned from one person’s success, but what about an entire organization or the associated efforts of an organization and its members? Or maybe from one single voice who is extremely proud of their own accomplishment? A resounding… Absolutely!

Whether your organization is small or large, a healthcare organization or an academic institution, the stories you share about the multiple benefits of being a Certified Nurse Educator/Certified Nurse Educator-Clinical (CNE/CNEcl) or employing someone who is a CNE/CNEcl are so important to the continued success of the  NLN and the CNE initiative. There is no better means to demonstrate support for CNE/CNEcl and their roles than telling the world how you and/or your organization are supporting CNE/CNEcl at your facility or conveying the goals you may have at your organization related to embracing and increasing the number of CNE/CNEcl providing services or education.

Sharing positive experiences and feedback with colleagues, administrators, stakeholders, and the community is an indicator of your own belief systems related to the true benefit of becoming a CNE/CNEcl. Sharing success stories is not equivalent to “showing off” but rather an opportunity to show one’s commitment to the certification and associated process as well as the organization itself.

The reinforcement of this importance and commitment will be construed as motivational in nature for the many others who are contemplating becoming a CNE/CNEcl or will soon be seeking renewal. This sense of community will strengthen relationships between team members and will motivate other CNE/CNEcl to begin sharing positive feedback with each other as a way of supporting team morale, regardless of location. This community of interest represents a great benefit to institutions of higher learning, medical professionals, and organizations. Items to consider and that should be touted may include recognition, feeling valued and supported, improved self-esteem, improved performance and awareness of best practices, and a commitment to education.

Sharing success is a tool we can all use to bolster interest, improve retention and renewals, and increase the number of CNE/CNEcl across the country. Join in recognizing the value of becoming certified or maintaining your CNE/CNEcl credential.

Recently, while attending a Program Advisory Committee meeting for South University, West Palm Beach, Campus President Dr. Mark Everett witnessed a question being posed to a program director as to the number of CNEs that were employed by South University and across the campus. Three programs were represented: UG BSN, RN-BSN, and MSN-FNP.  The question was posed by an administrator at a local hospital; the answer was unknown for the university as a whole. Dr. Everett mentioned his involvement with the NLN and indicated he would like to know the interest of those in attendance, educators, and administrators in regards to an in-service about CNE/CNEcl application process, program, and renewals. The interest was tremendous.

As a result, South University will be hosting an event on campus in the near future to help market and promote the NLN and the CNE/CNEcl initiative. It is anticipated that invitees will include nursing educators from educational institutions and area hospitals and clinics. It is further anticipated that 30 to 40 individuals will participate. Dr. Everett serves as an NLN CNE commissioner and public member, and is very proud of his role and responsibilities.

Sharing Stories

Be impactful, inspirational, sincere, and authentic. Present the benefits, the challenges, and the rewards. Host informational events. Rally those “on the fence” and encourage certification. Speak to the board, presidents and deans, and administrators and directors, and do so regularly. It is time that we all embrace and help to add and sustain CNE/CNEcl at our institutions of higher learning and healthcare organizations that have an impact on the well-being of the public and communities we serve.

CNE-SENTINEL---2As part of the NLN’s ongoing services for our members, we have added a Coronavirus Resource Center. There you will find links to important information from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the NLN, as well as exclusive tips and advice to help hospitals, schools and programs teach and support students.

You’ll also find a Message to the Nursing Education Community from Dr. Tener Goodwin Veenema of the National Academy of Medicine and a Professor of Nursing and Public Health at Johns Hopkins. Dr. Veenema offers guidance and criteria for nonclinical courses, clinical placements, and patient interactions to evaluate when deciding how to develop and implement contingency plans.

Additionally, Dr. Veenema provides recommendations to schools and faculty concerning student travel, when people should stay home, and topics to cover when teaching about infectious diseases. These also may have applications for hospitals and other clinical settings.

Check out her message with bulleted action steps about what to tell students; what to do about clinical placements; how to keep yourself and others safe; the importance of staying calm; when you should stay home from work; and how to be a support to your colleagues during this time. You can find it all at the NLN Coronavirus Resource Center

The NLN will also provide updates about the impact of the coronavirus on nursing education through the bi-weekly NLN Member Update from NLN CEO Dr. Beverly Malone as well as on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn. Thanks to all of you in nursing education for doing your part to provide quality nursing and health care across the nation.